Planetary Patchwork
Upcoming Session
Planetary Reading Group
Anniversary Session
Archive
Lénia Marques (Rotterdam) & Maria Sofia Pimentel Biscaia (Aveiro)
Transforming Places Through Street Art: Bordalo II and the City
Esper Postma (Berlin/Deventer)
GAGAPALIZI: A New Museum for Florence
Sasha Huber (Helsinki)
“Demounting Louis Agassiz” Artistic Renegotiation of Archive, Memory & Place
Sasha Shestakova (Bochum)
Decolonizing Soviet Art History
Aziza Chaouni (Fez/Toronto)
Sidi Harazem: Co-Designing Heritage Preservation in a Modern Oasis
Cristiana Strava (Amsterdam)
At Home with Colonial Materialities: Snapshots of Heritage-Making and Unmaking on Casablanca’s Margins
Kateryna Kublytska (Kharkiv/London)
Destruction of Immovable Cultural Heritage During the War of the Russian Federation Against Ukraine
Ece Canlı (Porto)
Beneath the Thick Skin, Behind the Brick Wall
Robert Glas (Rotterdam)
On the film-installation '1986 Or A Sphinx's Interior'
Łukasz Stanek (Manchester)
Socialist Worldmaking
Dawit Benti (Addis Ababa)
Challenges of Urban Heritage Conservation during State-Led Gentrification of Addis Ababa's City Centre
Taputukura Raea (Wellington) & Digital Pasifik
Re-Claiming Pacific History - Making Pacific Cultural Heritage Visible and Accessible
Laura Ammann (Berlin)
The Appeal of the Colonial Baroque to the Brazilian Modernists
Paul Basu (Bonn/London) & Ozioma Onuzulike (Nsukka) & Ikenna Onwuegbuna (Nsukka)
[Re:]Entanglements: Colonial Collections in Decolonial Times
Between Zones of Conflict and the Realm of Dreams: Planetary Perspectives on Film and Filmmaking
Workshop I
Mykola Ridnyi (Kyiv)
Mariana Martínez-Bonilla (Mexico-City)
Yashaswini Raghunandan (Bangalore)
Chihab El Khachab (Oxford)
Christian Thiam (Dakar)
Roundtable: Fide Dayo (Rome) & Norma Gregory (Nottingham)
Alyssa K. Barry (Dakar)
Navigating the Digital Spaces
Ndapewoshali Ndahafa Ashipala (Windhoek) & Tuuda Haitula (Windhoek) & Museums Association of Namibia
Museum Development as a Tool for Strengthening Cultural Rights – A Case Study
Njabulo Chipangura (Manchester)
Community Museums in Zimbabwe as an Alternative Form of Representing Living Cultures
Annalisa Bolin (Kalmar) and David Nkusi (Kigali)
Decolonizing Heritage Management in Rwanda: Community Engagement and Homegrown Solutions
Chantal Umuhoza (Kigali)
Decolonizing Conservation Practices in Rwanda Museums
Alessandra Ferrini (London)
Unruly Connections
Hiba Shalabi (Tripoli) with translation by Malak Altaeb (Tripoli/Paris)
#SaveTheOldCityOfTripoli
Banji Chona (Rome)
Ngoma zya Budima: Exploring Grief and Death, Celebrating Life and Love, Batonga Drum Story
Victoria Phiri (Lusaka), Samba Yonga (Lusaka) & Mulenga Kapwepwe (Lusaka) & the Women’s History Museum Zambia
Decolonization of Cultural Objects in the Process of Restitution and Repatriation. The Case of Zambian Cultural Objects in Swedish Museums
Schedule
Planetary Reading Group
Anniversary Session
Dantaé Garee Elliott (New York)
Ada M. Patterson (Rotterdam, London & Barbados)
Zainab Floyd (New York)
December 16
Lénia Marques (Rotterdam) & Maria Sofia Pimentel Biscaia (Aveiro)
Transforming Places Through Street Art: Bordalo II and the City
  • Work by Bordalo II

In recent years, street art has gained increased attention in academia, which reflects the growth and expansion of different forms of street art in relation to place. Local governments have been enabling street art as part of a strategy for place branding or, more holistically, as placemaking. The city becomes a canvas with both aesthetic and symbolic value. For the artist, it is an opportunity to create art while using the public space, for example, for socially strong messages. But are these still subversive and voicing the subcultures they belong to, or are they becoming commodified? Is the transformative potential of street art augmented or reduced in such a context? It is in this framework that we will explore the work of Bordalo II, work which is born of a creative artistic expression of political communication, and it has now become not only welcome but also a desired – and (somehow) commodified – creation in many cities around the world.

Esper Postma (Berlin/Deventer)
GAGAPALIZI: A New Museum for Florence
  • © Esper Postma

In the 19th century, Florence became celebrated as the cradle of the Renaissance. Countless museums were founded which fragmented collections along the lines of disciplines, most importantly science and art. Nowadays, visitors to Florence can be overwhelmed by the tremendous number of museums and archives in the city. The  fragmentation of its collections makes it difficult to understand their interrelations, as well as the historical context in which all this wealth was created. 

The GAGAPALIZI is a new institution which employs architecture to make the relations between existing museum collections more explicit. By means of an architectural intervention it integrates three existing museums that are at close proximity: the Galilei Galileo Museum, Palazzo Vecchio, and the Uffizi. The GAGAPALIZI tells the whole story of Florence, including the darker side of the Renaissance.